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Friday, March 11, 2011

Enterprise D






Here are some images of AMT/Round 2 models of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC - 1701 - D from Star Trek The Next Generation.
From Wikipedia"
The Galaxy class is a fictional class of starship in the science fiction franchise Star Trek. The most notable Galaxy-class starship is the USS Enterprise-D, the primary setting of Star Trek:The Next Generation.

The Galaxy-class model was designed by Andrew Probert for Star Trek: The Next Generation. Interiors were designed by Probert and Herman Zimmerman during the first season. Richard D. James designed and rebuilt the sets for the remaining six years, while Zimmerman returned for Star Trek Generations.

Within the series it is stated that design and construction of the Galaxy-class began in the 2340s, with the first ships being commissioned in the 2360s. According to dialog in the Next Generation episodes "11001001" and "Booby Trap", designers of the USS Enterprise-D included Orfil Quinteros and Leah Brahms. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry stated that only six Galaxy-class starships had been constructed;, in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episodes "Sacrifice of Angels" and "Favor the Bold" no fewer than nine are seen as part of a single "Fleet" and by this point in the series the Galaxy-class USS Enterprise-D, USS Yamato, and USS Odyssey had all been destroyed. The Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual provides a possible canonical workaround by claiming that, while only six ships were ordered initially, Starfleet reserved the right to procure six more at a later date. Indeed it was likely a necessity given the increase in hostilities with the Dominion, the Klingons and the Borg as seen in Deep Space 9 and Star Trek: First Contact.

The ship's design features the classic Star Trek configuration: a saucer section connected via a vertical "neck" to the stardrive section, with warp nacelles attached to the rear of the stardrive section via pylons. The Galaxy-class contrasts with previous starships (specifically the Constitution class starship), however, in that the saucer section is considerably wider than it is long (instead of perfectly round); the nacelles pylons are roughly half the height of the ship's neck (instead of the same height); and the entire ship is designed with an emphasis on forward-leaning arcs (instead of a basic geometry of straight and parallel lines).

4 comments:

Pat Tillett said...

this is pretty cool looking! Nice paint!

Warren Zoell said...

Thanks Pat.

Stephen said...

What were some of the painting techniques you used to accomplish the panel detailing? I'm going to be painting the same model soon and haven't done it in years. Any pointers would be welcome.

Amazing paint job by the way.

xorkaya@gmail.com

Warren Zoell said...

Stephen - This is the new kit that comes with aztec decals. Is yours the new kit? If it is I would suggest you paint the parts their base colour first (do you have an airbrush?). The kit calls for a light ghost grey but I preferred a dark ghost grey making it closer to how it appeared in the movie Generations. To each his own. Your next step would be to paint the detail parts their colours, eg: the phaser banks, windows, etc (are you lighting the kit?). If not I would suggest using black and/or white Uniball pens. I chose all black with mine but I may add white windows in the future. If you're lighting the kit that's a whole different set of instructions. Next (and this is important) cover all major parts with Future wax available at any grocery or department store. A bottle is around $8 and will last you a lifetime. What Future does is apply a high gloss surface to your model. What this does is to help prevent any ghosting /silvering of the decals that may occur when they have dried. Apply Future before applying decals. Before applying the decals you will need from your hobby store a bottle of Microsol decal set (it smells like strong vinegar). Before applying a decal be sure to apply some decal set on the area of application before placing decal. What decal set does is soften the decal to allow a proper fit over contours plus it also helps in preventing silvering. When completely dry. cover in a flat or semi gloss coat. One more thing, before starting you may wish to sand off the aztec line ridges that are all over the model. These were used as guide lines for painting the aztec pattern on the model back in the day (1987). However with today's aztec decaling they are no longer necessary and besides the model looks much better without them. I hope this helps you. Any more question don't hesitate to ask.